Professor Dumblesnore
16. American. Female.
Currently reading: The Sound and the Fury and Miss Perengrine's Home for Peculiar Children
...
Recommendations are always welcome, homeskillets.

nedsseveredhead:

I feel so proud when friends tell me their parents like me. Like damn right they do, I am a delight.

alwaysactually:

lusilly:

some muggleborn like “i want to be an astronaut when i grow up!”

wizard kids like “wtf is an astronaut”

"oh you know…the people who go to the moon"

tegan-or-sara:

me around small children

(Source: tashromanoff)

i-may-be-strange:

His character was golden and the only reason to watch that train wreck

(Source: freak-thefreak-out)

mightbeafuckingunicorn:

stillinastorm:

I do not want Looking for Alaska to be a movie. But if it has to be, I think it needs to be rated R so that it can be told truthfully. It’s not a cutesy teen romance and it shouldn’t be treated like one.

It’s not cutesy teen romance and it shouldn’t be treated like one

sailorp00n:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

This is so diverse and positive and wonderful I am in love

http://theconsultingempath.tumblr.com/post/91915759235/misterracoon-roachpatrol-yeah-seriously-tell

misterracoon:

roachpatrol:

yeah seriously tell us how wizardry’s done in the new world tell me how the wizards from france and spain and britain stamped out the brujos and the medicine men and set up their own schools tell me what the fuck the british raj did to fucking india…

parslemouths:

I love the hp movies but it is so painful because I want charlie weasley, I want peeves, I want a kinder, accurate ron and an unperfect, accurate hermione. I want all the little sassy, clever, lines left out in the movies and all the really important details that were left out.

(Source: parslemouths)


The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

(Source: fashion-and-film)

gayinsect:

i luv kids they are so much funner to talk to than adults. i asked a toddler today whats up and he said “ten” with such conviction i really did believe it was an adequate response to my question for a second

booksandhotchocolate:

To celebrate Books and Hot Chocolate’s latest follower milestone, I decided to hold a mini giveaway featuring the books I’ve read and re-read so far this first half of the year :)

Rules:

  • Must be following booksandhotchocolate (this is exclusive for my followers only)
  • Reblog and like for a chance to win. You can reblog several times but please don’t spam your followers. NO GIVEAWAY BLOGS.
  • There will be three winners getting one book each.
  • Winners may choose ANY book written by any of the authors featured above.
  • Books may be hardcover or paperback but must be under $20 (Canadian dollars)
  • This will be available worldwide (wherever) The Book Depository ships.
  • You must be willing to give your shipping address away to me.
  • The winners will be randomly chosen through a random number generator
  • Keep your ask box open so I can contact you if you win. The winners have 24 hours to reply back to me via messaging (NOT fan mail)
  • The giveaway ends August 5th, 2014
  • If you have any questions ask me here (I will not answer anon questions)

hermionejg:

casmopolitan:

Emma was right

DAMN RIGHT.

think-progress:

mediamattersforamerica:

Fox News spent a segment mocking and laughing at Illinois State University’s decision to accommodate LGBT students with all-gender restroom signs, stating, “we’re all a little confused by it.”

Turns out, a lot of people don’t share Fox’s bewilderment. 

The following day, host Steve Doocy conducted man-on-the-street interviews with the sign, asking random “Fox fans” what they thought it meant. 

Much to Fox’s dismay, not a single fan (including a young boy) responded to the question with the confusion and outrage that Fox expected. 

Watch the full interview — it’s pretty great. 

Womp womp

anxiouspineapples:

my talents include coming across as mildly interested in harry potter rather than entirely obsessed

fullyactivated:

sherlacking:

Feminism is knowing that you don’t have to wear things to impress a man

Feminism is also knowing that it’s okay to wear things to impress a man if you want to

Society forgets the first part, tumblr forgets the second part